Sick green sea turtle finny set for broome rehabilitation

Sick green sea turtle finny set for broome rehabilitation

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A critically endangered green sea turtle called broome has been named, the first time a live turtle has been seen for five years.

The endangered yellow sea turtle lives only a few kilometres from broome on the western coast of New South Wales, and people in Australia have been worried it was likely extinct.

The turtle’s long life was recorded by the Western Australian government in a report in 2006, but until then, there had bee에비앙 카지노n no evidence of the green turtle’s existence.

Scientists say there are no known natu샌즈 카지노ral breeding pairs for broome turtle and the numbers of green turtle are reduced by habitat loss and the encroachment of man베스트 카지노-made manmade sea trees and the destruction of the green turtles’ nesting grounds.

Now, researchers from the University of the Western Cape and the Marine Institute for Conservation at the University of Victoria have come up with a breeding male and female that has been named by a conservation and conservation science society.

The new broome male will be kept in captivity and will be the first captive-bred green sea turtle.

The new broome female will be moved from Broome Bay to an artificial estuary near Broome where her reproductive life cycle is planned to be studied.

“I’m sure that she will give off the right scent in the new environment,” Dr Paul Brown, co-author of the new report said.

“This is a great example of a captive male and female that have been developed together.

“These animals have already shown incredible adaptability and have evolved in the wild.

“They can swim in rivers and can run in shallow water in the estuary, just a few kilometres away from broome.

“These studies will show their full value to conservation and scientific science.”

Broome Bay is a marine lagoon on the northern coast of Sydney that has been under-protected since 2002.

It is not connected to any other estuary and is protected under the laws of the Torres Strait Islands.

The island, which lies on the eastern coast of New South Wales, has seen much of its life-cycle ruined, and it now contains more than 5,000 brown, grey and black sea turtles.

Broome Bay’s habitat is currently being degraded by man-made structures like mangroves, and there are significant conservation and scientific concerns about how to restore it.

Topics: animals, invertebrates-and-nature, conservation, invertebrat